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Faculty & Research

 

Laura Gitlin: Faculty Directory

Laura N. Gitlin, PhD

Professor
Director, Center for Innovative Care in Aging
Laura Gitlin
410-955-7539
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Overview

“Developing and testing novel interventions that enhance the ability of older adults with cognitive or physical impairments to age in place with quality of life can make an important difference in the lives of older people and their families." 

Dr. Laura N. Gitlin, an applied research sociologist, is nationally and internationally recognized in the areas of nonpharmacologic approaches in dementia care, family caregiving, functional disability and aging in place. She is a well-funded researcher, having received continuous research and training grants from both federal agencies and private foundations, including the Alzheimer’s Association and the National Institutes of Health for over 24 years. Her programs of research include understanding adaptive processes in old age—particularly with the use of assistive devices and environmental modifications—psycho-social-environmental approaches to helping older people with physical frailty age in place, nonpharmacologic approaches to enhancing quality of life of persons with dementia and their family caregivers, mental health disparities in older African Americans and depression treatments, and translating and implementing evidence-based interventions for family caregivers, individuals with dementia, and older adults with functional difficulties. Dr. Gitlin holds a joint appointment in the School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry. She is developing with colleagues the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing Center for Innovative Care in Aging which will examine issues related to developing and testing health promoting interventions for older adults and their families and implementation science.

Areas of Scholarly Expertise and Interest

Nonpharmacologic treatment in dementia care; family caregiving; aging in place; functional disability; adaptation to chronic illness; geriatrics, depression and health disparities.
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