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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Rushton Moral Resilience Scale

You are free to reproduce and use the Rushton Moral Resilience Scale ™ without modification, for research or clinical practice. Any modifications in wording would need to be re-validated. The Rushton Moral Resilience Scale ™ may be reproduced on forms with hospital or clinical unit letterhead or logo or used in electronic record systems.

Rushton Moral Resilience Scale, © 2021, Johns Hopkins University, Dr. Cynda Rushton, use with permission only.

About the Rushton Moral Resilience Scale ™

  • What may be assessed with the Rushton Moral Resilience Scale ™
    The levels of moral resilience of interprofessional clinicians (nurses, physicians, social workers and chaplains)

Obtaining and Using the Rushton Moral Resilience Scale ™

  • Is the Rushton Moral Resilience Scale ™ free?
    The Rushton Moral Resilience Scale ™ are available for use at no cost. There are no license fees. We do require that the Rushton Moral Resilience Scale ™ be properly cited/referenced in publications and/or presentations.
  • Do I need permission to use the Rushton Moral Resilience Scale ™?
    We do require that you receive permission to use the Rushton Moral Resilience Scale ™, whether for research or clinical use. The scale is copyrighted and Trademarked by Johns Hopkins University.
    Obtaining permission to use the scales is a simple, automated process. To receive permission to use the scale(s), please go to the Obtain the Scales section of this website.

    There are three steps to obtain the scales:

    o    Submit the Permission Request Form online.
    o    Receive an email confirmation with a link to review the User Permission Agreement and download the Rushton Moral Resilience Scale ™
    o    Review the User Permission Agreement.
    o    At the end of the page, click on a button to download The Rushton Moral Resilience Scale ™

    To receive permission to use the Rushton Moral Resilience Scale, Complete and Submit the Permission Request Form. We will then email you the User Permission Agreement, which further describes terms of use. The User Permission Agreement specifies that the scale must be referenced in your research and subsequent publications and presentations and may not be modified. To improve scale utility and adoption, please notify us of any resulting publication and/or presentation for inclusion in our dynamic, public databases and provide us with scale-translations for public dissemination (if applicable). Once the User Permission Agreement has been completed and returned to us, we will promptly send the scale and Scoring Guide to you.
  • Is the Rushton Moral Resilience Scale ™ available in different languages?
    The investigative team created and validated the original Rushton Moral Resilience Scale ™ in English. Unfortunately, we cannot vouch for the validity of any of these translated scales. Please review the User Agreement for further details.

    Please feel free to utilize our dynamic list of publications/presentations to contact other researchers for permission to use their translated versions. In addition, the authors of these translated scales may be willing to share psychometric data with you. Should you require assistance in finding a scale translation or contacting the authors/researchers of said studies, please reach out to us; we may be able to assist you in your efforts.

  • How do I reference the Rushton Moral Resilience Scale ™?
    We do require that the Rushton Moral Resilience Scale ™ be properly cited/referenced in publications and/or presentations. The original article may be referenced as follows (APA format, 7th edition):

    Heinze KE, Hanson G, Holtz H, Swoboda S, & Rushton CH. (2020). Measuring Healthcare Inter-Professionals’ Moral Resilience: Validation of the Rushton Moral Resilience Scale. Journal of Palliative Medicine. https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/jpm.2020.0328

    Please reference other articles/publications/presentations accordingly.

Administering and Scoring the Rushton Moral Resilience Scale ™

  • May I translate the Rushton Moral Resilience Scale ™?
    Yes, you may translate the Rushton Moral Resilience Scale ™. We recommend that you translate and back-translate to improve accuracy of the translation. If you do decide to perform your own translation of a scale, we ask that you provide us with the final translation of the scale for public dissemination on our webpage.

    We will credit your work and provide reference to any affiliated publications that accompany the translated scale.

    You will be responsible for the validation and forward and backward translation of the instrument.  We will not verify the accuracy of the translation.

  • How can the Rushton Moral Resilience Scale ™ be administered?
    The scales may be self-administered.
  • Are there scoring and coding criteria?

    The items form 4 subscales: 1) Buoyancy in Response to Moral Adversity; 2) Personal Integrity; 3) Relational Integrity; and 4) Moral Efficacy. All items should be coded so that higher score indicate more resiliency; this will require recoding negatively worded items indicated with a (R) in the items listed on the scale. Obtain each subscale score by computing the mean for scores on the items associated with that subscale. See specific instructions below. Alternatively, you can compute an overall score by taking the mean of all 17 items.

    Subscales:
    Responses to Moral Adversity =(item2+item4+item5+item8+item14)/5 Personal Integrity=(item1+item6+item17)/3
    Relational Integrity=(item10+item11+item13+item15+item16)/5
    Moral Efficacy=(item3+item7+item9+item12)/4

    Total Score:
    Total RMRS = (item1+item2+item3+item4+item5+ item6+item7+item8+item9+item10+ item11+item12+item13+item14+item15+item16+item17)/17

  • Are there specific cut-off ranges for interpreting data results?

    We do not prescribe any cut-offs, for example for low/moderate/high moral resilience. The scale was created to be used to demonstrate relationships between varying levels of moral resilience and other constructs (e.g., burnout) as well as evaluating change over time. The scale was not designed to be diagnostic. As such grouping scores into categories would be based on arbitrary criteria and result in a loss of information.