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Posted: 7/13/2011

Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame AwardJohns Hopkins University School of Nursing professors Fannie Gaston-Johansson, PhD, RN, FAAN, and Jacquelyn Campbell, PhD, RN, FAAN, will be inducted into the 2011 International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame. The two recipients will be honored at Sigma Theta Tau International’s 22nd International Nursing Research Congress in Cancun, Mexico on July 14, 2011.

“I consider being inducted into the International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame one of my highest achievements class,” said Gaston-Johansson. “Being recognized for the body of work that I have accomplished as a scientist [Symptom Prevention, Descriptions and Management, assessment of pain, patent of the Painometer, and development of a Comprehensive Coping Strategy in patients in a variety of populations], brings credibility to that work for which I am very grateful.”

“I am honored to be inducted into the hall of fame,” Campbell noted. “My research has only been possible because of the collaboration of my colleagues at Hopkins and elsewhere, and the cooperation of domestic violence organizations around the world.”

Gaston-Johansson is an internationally renowned nurse educator, researcher, and clinical practitioner. The first African-American woman to be a tenured full professor at Johns Hopkins University, she directs the Center on Health Disparities Research and leads the international and interdisciplinary Minority Global Health Disparities Research Training Program. Her research focuses on end-of-life issues with an emphasis on strategies to manage pain and other symptoms in patients with cancer and terminal or chronic illnesses.

Campbell is a national leader in research advocacy in the field of domestic and intimate partner violence (IPV). Her studies have paved the way for a growing body of interdisciplinary investigations by researchers in the disciplines of nursing, medicine, and public health. As a nurse educator and mentor, Campbell has led by example in inspiring new generations of nurse researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, and her extensive expertise is frequently sought by national and international policy makers in exploring IPV and its potential health effects on families and communities.

The International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame recognizes STTI members who are nurse researchers; who have achieved long-term, broad national and/or international recognition for their work; and whose research has impacted the profession and the people it serves.