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Posted: 7/7/2011

SON BuildingMartha Sylvia, PhD, MBA, RN, Shawna Mudd, DNP, PNP-BC, and Ellen Ray, DNP, CNM, are the latest nurse educators to bring their expertise to the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing (JHSON) for the 2011-2012 academic year.

Sylvia joined the Department of Health Systems and Outcomes in March. Her journey to becoming a Johns Hopkins assistant professor began in 2001, when she interviewed for acceptance into the JHSON Master's in Nursing/Master's of Business Administration program. Sylvia then earned her PhD from the School and served as the Director of Outcomes and Evaluation at Johns Hopkins HealthCare (JHHC) where she led a research and analyst staff in developing innovative population health strategies.

At JHSON she teaches Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) students in the Capstone sequence and Leadership course and has developed a new course, Clinical Data Management. Sylvia maintains her practice specialty at JHHC as Lead Developer of Population Health Analytics. "From the moment I walked in [in 2001], I knew this would be a special place to develop my professional and academic future in nursing. I hope to use my skills to give back to the School which has given so much to me," Sylvia explains.

The School also welcomes Mudd and Ray, both graduates of the JHSON DNP program.  Mudd, a pediatric nurse practitioner in the Johns Hopkins Hospital pediatric emergency department for 10 years, has focused on improving pain management for children, in addition to improving asthma care for children in the emergency department. "I look forward to continued collaboration with faculty and students to enhance the health and quality of care of children," Mudd says.

Ray, a certified nurse-midwife, has worked in the field of maternal-child health care for more than 30 years. She founded and directed the first midwifery service at Howard County Hospital in 1986 and practiced there for 17 years before joining JHSON as a part-time instructor in 2003. She hopes to continue research to help underserved pregnant women. "Becoming a full-time faculty member allows me to give back to the profession through the education and training of future nurses and nurse-midwives," Ray adds.