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Hopkins Nursing Excels with Awards, Appointments, Grants, and Presentations

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Posted: 6/6/2011

Faculty and students at Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing (JHSON) continue to succeed in carrying out the School's mission of academic integrity and excellence in both scholarship and research. Their efforts have been recognized in a variety of awards, appointments, and presentations.

Professor Marie T. Nolan, PhD, MPH, RN, FAAN, was named president of the International Network for Doctoral Education in Nursing (INDEN), for a four-year term, effective May 11. "It is an honor to work with nursing leaders from all over the world to advance INDEN's mission of excellence in doctoral education in nursing," Nolan said. SON PhD Candidate Carrie Tudor also serves as a board member for INDEN, and SON Dean Martha N. Hill delivered the keynote address at the INDEN biennial conference May 9-11 in Malta. "The SON was and remains well-represented at INDEN," Nolan noted.

In April, associate professor Julie Stanik-Hutt, PhD, ACNP, CCNS, FAAN, was presented with the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) 2011 Outstanding Policy Award at the annual NONPF meeting in Albuquerque, NM. The award is given to nurse practitioners who lead in policy development, advocate for NP-related legislation, lead policy implementation, and are politically active in legislation related to advance practice registered nurses (APRNs). Fellow faculty member Marie Nolan said to Stanik-Hutt, "This is a fitting tribute to your leadership of the NONPH and as a global leader in advance practice nursing. I'm so pleased to see all of your work has been recognized with this award by this important professional organization." Other faculty members at the conference were Benita Walton-Moss, Sharon O'Neill, Beth Sloand, and Kathleen Becker. Walton-Moss and O'Neill presented a poster presentation, "The Use of Fidelity Simulation in a Graduate Health Assessment Course." Walton-Moss and Becker offered a podium presentation, "Interprofessional Education in the Care of Complex Community-Based Patients."

PhD student Rachel Klimmek has received financial support, a significant component of doctoral research, from the John A. Hartford Foundation. Through its Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity (BAGNC) initiative, Klimmek has been awarded $98,481 over the next two years to complete her research, "Understanding the Work of Transitional Cancer Survivorship for Rural African American Elders and Their Caregivers."  The dissertation focuses broadly on how older adults living in rural communities and the persons who care for them manage the work of maintaining their health and their everyday lives in the critical months of transition following completion of primary cancer treatment. 

According to the BAGNC's website, its mission is to produce expert academicians, practitioners and researchers who will lead the field of geriatric nursing, [and] ultimately improve the care of elders in our society.

Maternal-child nursing is becoming a more popular nursing niche, and has been recognized as such by organizations such as the March of Dimes. SON graduate student Julie Perkins is the recipient of the 2011 March of Dimes Graduate Award, given to nurses enrolled in graduate programs of maternal-child nursing. The $5,000 scholarship recognizes and supports excellence in nursing care of mothers and babies. "I...have had the privilege of working with her since her first day here at the SON," said assistant professor Elizabeth Betty Jordan, DNSc, RNC. "It's wonderful to see her hard work in the midwifery program recognized."

The American Academy of Nurse Practitioners Foundation (AANPF) has recently initiated a Humanitarian Program to recognize AANP nurse practitioners who have made humanitarian contributions in diverse and important ways. Doctoral student Katia Reinert is among the inaugural recipients of this award and will be formally recognized at AANP 26th annual conference on June 23, 2011 in Las Vegas, NV.