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Hopkins Nursing Bloggers Are Here, There, Everywhere

Posted: 7/28/2010

From Haiti, to the Congo, and around Baltimore, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing (JHUSON) bloggers are sharing their stories about nursing school, relief work, and rural healthcare.

A new lineup of student and faculty bloggers are now contributing entries on a recently revamped

SON blog page

. The page features undergraduate and graduate students in addition to faculty bloggers and a

blog from Haiti

that recently earned a gold Hermes Creative Award.

Readers on the redesigned blog page will find entries about the challenges and rewards of nursing school, this summer's intense heat in Baltimore, and ongoing community health and microfinance work in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Added features on the page now highlight new blog posts, track the School's latest social media activity on Facebook and Twitter, and offer subscription via RSS.

Diana Ziser, Accel. '11, one of the new student bloggers, is posting entries about her early impressions of nursing school. "Though its been really overwhelming acclimating to a new place, getting around without my beloved 1993 Corolla, on top of what seems to be endless amounts of homework, everything has seemed to work out," she writes.

This isn't Ziser's first experience blogging -- she previously blogged for the Office of Admissions at the University of Portland (UP) in Oregon. "Blogging about JHUSON is a chance to give people a good picture of what school is like here, what the people are like here, what your schedule is like here," she says.

Like Ziser, many of the student bloggers from the Accelerated and Traditional undergraduate programs relocated to Baltimore to attend Hopkins, but their reasons for pursuing nursing vary. Jill Kronick, Accel. '11, views nursing as a rewarding career, while Lauren Toussaint, Accel. '11, wants to "add a clinical, hands-on component to my public health knowledge base." 

Faculty member Nancy Glass is currently

blogging from the DRC

, where she is working on improving the health, economic, and social well-being of survivors of rape, their families, and communities with the Rama Levina Foundation, a mobile clinic program that provides care to survivors in the Walungu Territory of South Kivu. She is spending a portion of her time in DRC visiting families participating in the Pigs for Peace microfinance project. "Our goal this year is to visit each of the 186 women and families participating in the project. A home visit gives us a chance to see the pigs and their piglets and talk with women and families about the challenges and successes of the project and get their thoughts and ideas for the next step in the project," Glass writes in a recent post.

Find more blogs from students, faculty, and the Office of Admissions and Student Services at

http://blogs.nursing.jhu.edu

.