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MSN/MPH Nurse Practitioner

Annie Lee
"I knew Hopkins would teach me to be an exceptional nurse and a better person."
Annie Lee, MSN/MPH '09, BS '07

Annie Lee is a self-described wanderer. After receiving her undergraduate degree in Biology, Lee joined the Peace Corps and taught science in Malawi. She came to the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing in 2006, where her clinical placements led her to private practice, a public clinic, the National Military Hospital in Bethesda, and an internship...

Read Annie's Story

Program
Overview

Program Overview

Completed Application Deadlines

December 1 for summer entry 

Focusing on Public Health

The MSN-NP/MPH program at the Johns Hopkins University integrates advanced nursing practice and management with a population-based perspective toward improving the delivery of nursing services in various local and international settings.

If your professional interests lie in the intersection of evidence-based, clinical practice, the societal factors that impact care, and the public health implications of how services and treatment are organized and provided, you will experience the rare opportunity to tailor your program of study through this joint offering from the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing and the Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Those who earn a Hopkins MSN-NP/MPH joint degree:

  • Develop, implement, and evaluate innovative healthcare programs and policies
  • Provide primary care that includes health promotion and prevention of specific disorders and injury
  • Identify, treat, or refer for treatment of health problems
  • Take positions in government at international, national, and local levels; community organizations; universities; and the private sector

Graduates of the program receive a single diploma signed by the Deans of the School of Nursing and Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Program
Requirements

Program Requirements

Students may apply for full- or part-time study.

The school seeks individuals who will bring to the student body the qualities of scholarship, motivation, and commitment. The Admissions Committee is interested in each applicant as an individual and will consider both academic potential and personal qualities. Therefore, school records, test scores, recommendations, and essays about goals and interests are important.

Recommendations about a student's character, intellectual curiosity, seriousness of purpose, and range of extracurricular activities are considered.

Selection factors include:

  • Bachelor of Science degree in nursing
  • Scholastic Grade Point Average of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale from an accredited college or university
  • GRE scores within the past five years (MSN/MPH applicants only). Our GRE school code is 5767.
  • Demonstrated commitment to nursing practice and scholarly pursuit
  • Community service and professional commitment
  • Interview with faculty member*
  • Written expression of goals
  • Letters of recommendation
  • Applicants must submit evidence of current nursing licensure. Students must have or obtain Maryland Registered Nurse licensure for matriculation

*Interview with a faculty member may or may not be requested.

Additionally, applicants for the Adult-Geriatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner program

  • Will be exceptional students who are carefully chosen based on a number of factors including previous experiences.  Direct care acute care experiences will be required;
    OR 
  • Will be required to attend part time during their first year in the program while working as a staff nurse in a critical care unit full time (more than 36 hours per week), and will not begin NP clinical courses until their second year.

Prerequisites

  • Undergraduate Statistics
  • Health Assessment (for NP and CNS applicants only)

In addition to the prerequisites above, the following courses are also required for MSN/MPH applicants:

  • College level course in Quantitative Science (ex. Algebra, Calculus, Statistics)
  • General Biology
  • Health Related Science (ex. Nutrition, Anatomy, Physiology)

Transfer of Credit

Transfer of credit is granted on an individual basis. The decision is based on equivalent content (for required courses), credit allotment and satisfactory completion of courses. You may petition for permission to substitute a course from another college or university by submitting a request to the Office of Admissions and Student Services along with the complete course syllabus.

Up to 6 credits of graduate course work taken at Johns Hopkins University or elsewhere may be accepted for transfer. Course work must have been completed within the last five years. Course work at the undergraduate level will not be considered for advanced standing credit.

 

Admissions
Procedures

Admissions Procedures

Start Early

Students are strongly encouraged to complete the application process early. Candidates for admission will be notified of a decision in writing after all the application documents are received and the Admissions Committee's review.

Note: The admissions committee for the Public Health Nursing, Nurse-Midwifery Track consists of representatives from both Johns Hopkins University and Shenandoah University.

Follow all instructions carefully to avoid delays in the processing of application materials. To expedite the application process, students may submit all supporting documentation, including official transcripts and recommendations, in sealed envelopes in one package (test scores excluded). Application supporting documentation may also arrive separately. Before a final admission decision can be made, all supporting documentation must be received.

Submit

  • Completed and signed application form
  • Signed statement acknowledging the School's Ethics Policy
  • $75 non-refundable application fee
    (Make check or money order payable to "Johns Hopkins University")
  • Goal statement
  • Three recommendations:
    • At least one recommendation from an academic source (current or previous professor)
    • Remaining two recommendations may be from either an academic or professional source (employment/volunteer supervisor)
    • Recommendations should be enclosed in sealed envelopes with the recommender's signature across the envelope flap
  • Official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended (including Johns Hopkins University)
  • Current résumé
  • Official GRE scores, if applying to the MSN/MPH or MSN/MBA programs, sent to the School of Nursing (School code: 5767)
  • Verification of current RN license, all RN's must obtain a Maryland RN license and present verification by the time of matriculation

Note: Due to changing clinical site regulations, students are required to undergo a criminal background check prior to matriculation. The School will provide information about this process to accepted students.

Applicants Who Have Studied Abroad

International applicants and applicants who have completed courses outside of the United States must submit:

More information for international applicants 
Office of International Student, Faculty, and Staff Services

Curriculum
 

Curriculum

(Adult, Pediatric, Family and Adult Acute Care tracks are similar in design. Students take track appropriate content for the track.

Nursing Requirements

NR.110.500 Philosophical, Theoretical, and Ethical Basis for Nursing
This course will explore the conceptual, theoretical, and ethical bases of nursing. Selected conceptual models and frameworks of nursing and ethics will be analyzed with emphasis on implications for nursing practice. This course is designed to provide students with frameworks, concepts, and personal and professional exercises for approaching nursing practice issues and to enhance the student's understanding of theoretical, conceptual and ethical issues in nursing and in health care and to respond to them specifically.
NR.110.502 Physiological/Pathophysiological Basis for Advanced Nursing Practice I
This course focuses on the interrelationship between normal physiology and pathophysiology across the lifespan. It is designed to expand the student's understanding of the pathophysiology underlying dysfunction in selected diseases that advanced practice nurses may commonly encounter in their patient populations. Using an integrative approach, representative alternations in physiologic function common throughout the lifespan are addressed. Completion of this course will enable the student to analyze and address physiologic challenges of practice. In addition, it will provide foundational knowledge for use in research involving issues that impact clinical practice. Weekly lecture/discussions are organized based on systems and cover topics from the cellular level up to major organ systems. Prerequisites: Undergraduate anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology.
NR.110.503 Applications of Research to Practice
This course prepares students for clinical, management, or education leadership roles in health care through translation of the best available evidence into practice within organizations and application of research for nursing practice. Students will develop skills and knowledge needed to review and synthesize the strength of evidence available, and recommend practice changes if indicated. Topics covered include: a review of the research process (including theoretical framework, design, and analysis, research design hierarchy), research critique, rating and synthesizing the strength of evidence, decision making for practice, research and research translation opportunities (outcomes, evaluation research, quality improvement, cost-effectiveness analysis), risk adjustment, measurement, research ethics and organizational change. Prerequisite: NR 110.501
NR.110.504 Context of Healthcare for Advanced Practice Nursing
This three credit course examines the scope and status of professional roles and responsibilities of nurses prepared for advanced clinical and managerial placements in diverse health care settings. Course content and activities will focus on understanding forces driving contemporary health care and enhancing skills in outcomes evaluation, as well as efficient and effective function in a continuous change health care environment.
NR.110.508 Clinical Pharmacology
This course focuses on the clinical uses and mechanisms of action of drug groups used in altered states of physiological function. Pharmacological mechanisms, drug interactions, side effects and contraindications will be presented as bases for clinical judgment and management of patients.
NR.110.537 Health Assessment and Measurement: Pediatric Variations
This course provides an intensive and comprehensive introduction to the skills of history taking and advanced physical assessment for the pediatric patient. Lecture and clinical experiences are designed to help the student apply their knowledge of physical assessment of pediatric clients to the primary care setting. Emphasis is placed on the differentiation between normal and abnormal findings, recognition of common health problems, development of a differential diagnosis and the process of critically thinking through problems related to child health. Pre/corequisites: NR 100.502, 100.508, 110.549, and 100.589 or 100.555
NR.110.546 Health Promotion & Disease Prevention
This course introduces the student to current issues, theories and research in health promotion and disease prevention related to individuals, families, aggregates and communities. The role of the advanced practice nurse in risk assessment, counseling, education and screening will be emphasized, as well as thinking broadly about health promotion needs from an ecological perspective. The first hour of each class will focus on the theoretical issues of health promotion and disease prevention. The second hour will examine the clinical issues relevant to health promotion throughout the lifespan. A case study approach will be emphasized.
NR.110.547 Diagnosis, Symptom and Illness Management I - Adult
This course provides didactic content to prepare the Advanced Practice Nurse to provide primary and/or acute care to adults, including older persons, experiencing health problems in one or more body systems. Nurse practitioner students focus on health care for all populations, with particular emphasis on underserved and those from other cultures. Students also emphasize health promotion and disease prevention, screening of adult and older populations, and providing culturally competent care. Didactic content addresses comprehensive diagnosis and management of common health problems, including appropriate diagnostic procedures, laboratory tests, and follow-up care for patients with both acute and chronic conditions. Professional, ethical, and legal issues are also addressed. Pre/corequisites: NR.110.502, 110.508 (Primary Care NPs), 110.549, 110.536/537, 110.572 (ACNP only)
NR.110.548 Diagnosis, Symptom and Illness Management I - Pediatrics
This course provides didactic information to prepare the pediatric or family nurse practitioner student to provide primary care for the pediatric population, from birth through adolescence. Emphasis is placed on integration of nursing process and theory with techniques of clinical health assessment and management of infants, children and adolescents. Didactic content addresses comprehensive diagnosis and management of common health problems, including appropriate diagnostic procedures, laboratory tests, and follow-up care for patients with both acute and chronic conditions. The course has a strong focus on health promotion, disease prevention, the care of underserved populations, and culturally competent care. Pre/corequisites: NR.110.502, 110.508, 110.537, and 110.549
NR.110.549 Advanced Health Assessment and Measurement
This course provides an introduction to the skills of advanced history taking and physical assessment. Lectures are designed to help the students apply their knowledge of health assessment to both primary and acute care settings. Emphasis is placed on differentiation between normal and abnormal findings, recognition of common health problems, and clinical reasoning. Core content will be taught simultaneously to adult, pediatric, family, and acute care nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist students. Course content will provide learning opportunities in the following conceptual areas: communication, history taking, problem oriented medical records, physical assessment, age and gender health screening and diagnostic testing. A clinical practicum provides opportunities to apply physical assessment skills in settings including emergency departments and schools. Pre/corequisites: NR 110.502, 110.508, 110.536 and/or 110.537
NR.110.551 Advanced Practice in Primary Care I: Adult/Gero
This course provides clinical experience in adult health care settings (adolescent ages 16 to geriatric). It emphasizes the integration of theory, anticipatory guidance, health promotion and disease prevention, and clinical decision making throughout the entire spectrum of the adult lifespan. Students will perform comprehensive and episodic clinical assessments, including appropriate diagnostic testing and therapeutic interventions. Management of both stable, chronic illness and treatment of acute, episodic health problems will be accomplished with the direction of clinical preceptors. Students will work with faculty, nurse practitioner, physician assistant, and physician preceptors in a variety of primary care clinical practicum sites including college health services, health maintenance organizations, community based clinics, long-term care, assisted living, continuing care, retirement communities, occupational health settings, urgent care/fast track, and private practice. Clinical placements are arranged by faculty with individual preceptors. Preceptors and students arrange mutually convenient clinical hours. A minimum of 196 clinical hours are required this semester; this works out to about 14 hours per week. A two hour weekly clinical seminar will review diagnostic and treatment regimens in a case study format. Information presented will focus on the collection of subjective and objective data, pertinent laboratory findings, diagnostic tests, differential diagnoses and a plan for therapeutic intervention. Cases will focus on underserved, vulnerable and elder patient populations. Prerequisites: NR.110.502, 110.508, 110.549, 110.536, 110.547 Corequisites: 110.557, 110.589
NR.110.552 Advanced Practice in Primary Care I: Pediatrics
This course provides clinical experience in pediatric health care settings (infant through adolescent). It emphasizes the integration of theory, development, health promotion and disease prevention, and clinical decision making. Students will perform comprehensive and episodic clinical assessments, including appropriate diagnostic testing and therapeutic interventions. Management of both stable, chronic illness and treatment of acute, episodic health problems will be accomplished with the direction of clinical preceptors. Clinical placements are arranged by faculty with individual preceptors. A minimum of 14 clinical hours per week are required. A two hour weekly clinical seminar will review diagnostic and treatment regimens in a case study format. Information presented will focus on the collection of subjective and objective data, pertinent laboratory findings, diagnostic tests, differential diagnoses and a plan for therapeutic intervention. Prerequisites: NR.110.502, 110.508, 110.549, 110.537, 110.548 Corequisites: NR.110.558, 110.589
NR.110.553 Advanced Practice in Primary Care II: Adults
This course prepares students to diagnose, treat and follow up common episodic and chronic illnesses in adolescents/adults. It integrates biomedical, psychological, social and nursing aspects of care that is based on age, gender, culture, and ethnicity. Emphasis is on: 1) defining a model of advanced nursing practice in various clinical settings, 2) longitudinal experience in the primary care management of selected clients, including underserved populations, in collaboration with other health care professionals, and 3) the application and utilization of evidence based practice. Clinical placements are arranged with individual preceptors. Clinical seminars will emphasize critical diagnostic and management information. Prerequisite: NR 110.551
NR.110.554 Advanced Practice in Primary Care II: Pediatrics
This course further prepares students to diagnose, treat and follow up common illnesses of increasing complexity in children and adolescents. It integrates biomedical, psychological, social and nursing aspects of care. Emphasis is on: 1) refining a model of advanced practice nursing in various clinical settings, and 2) longitudinal experience in the primary care management of selected clients, including underserved populations, in collaboration with other health care professionals. Clinical seminars will emphasize critical diagnostic and management information. Prerequisite: NR.110.552
NR.110.557 Diagnosis, Symptom and Illness Management II - Adults
This course expands on knowledge obtained in Diagnosis, Symptom, Illness I and continues to provide a foundation for the student to think critically about symptoms, differential diagnoses, diagnostic evaluation, and the management of common episodic and chronic health conditions throughout the adult lifespan including young adults, adults and older adults. The course emphasizes evidence based practice, health promotion and disease prevention as well as illness care that is based on age, gender, culture, ethnicity, and psycho-social issues. The unique perspective the nurse practitioner brings to the patient encounter, as well as interprofessional collaboration with colleagues, and knowledge of specialty referral are important elements of the course. Prerequisites: NR.110.502, 110.508, 110.536, 110.547, and 110.549 Corequisites: NR.110.551 and 110.589
NR.110.558 Diagnosis, Symptom and Illness Management II: Pediatrics
This course provides didactic information to prepare the pediatric or family nurse practitioner student to provide primary care for the pediatric population, from birth through adolescence. Emphasis is placed on integration of nursing process and theory with the incorporation of techniques and critical thinking skills for the clinical health assessment and management of infants, children and adolescents. Didactic content addresses comprehensive diagnosis and management of common health problems, including appropriate diagnostic procedures, laboratory tests, follow-up care, and referral/collaboration with specialty professionals for patients with both acute and chronic conditions. The course has a strong focus on health promotion, appropriate screening, and disease prevention, the care of underserved populations, and culturally competent care. Prerequisites: NR.110.502, 110.508, 110.537, 110.548, 110.549 Corequisites: NR.110.552, 110.589
NR.110.560 Program Development and Evaluation in Health Care
This course is an introduction to the basic methods of program evaluation. Emphasis is given to designs that are popular and feasible in health care settings, and to programs for vulnerable populations. Consultant and group facilitation skills are described and assessed. Prerequisites: There are no pre- or corequisites but recommended prior or concurrent courses include introductory graduate-level courses in descriptive and inferential statistics and research design.
NR.110.569 Advanced Practice in Women's Health
This course provides clinical experience in ambulatory obstetric and gynecologic health care settings. (Note: Students in this course may only see females ages 12 and older for OB/GYN issues, and males ages 12 and older for STD diagnosis and treatment). It emphasizes the integration and application of theory, health promotion, disease prevention, the diagnostic process, and clinical decision making to women's health issues. Students will perform comprehensive clinical assessments, including appropriate diagnostic testing and therapeutic interventions. Management of routine prenatal, postnatal, and gynecologic care and health problems will be accomplished under the direction of clinical preceptors. Seminar classes utilize both an interactive lecture and/or a case study format to review and analyze the diagnostic (process) and treatment regimens. While cases will focus on diverse populations of women, there will be an emphasis on women from underserved populations. Prerequisite: NR.110.551
NR.110.583 Family as a Unit: Clinical Integration
This course integrates theory and research in clinical application of the care of families by nurse practitioners. Students will provide care to adults and/or children within their family context in one clinical setting under the guidance of a clinical preceptor. Emphasis is on applying theory and research to families with members experiencing complex health problems. Related professional issues will be explored in the clinical seminar. Prerequisites: NR.110.551, 110.552, and 110.569. Pre/corequisite: NR.110.503
NR.110.589 Human and Family Development through the Lifespan
This course provides an overview of major concepts, theories, and research related to human development across the lifespan from the prenatal period to death. Simultaneously, major theories and research related to family development across the lifespan are examined. Significant factors that influence individual and family development functioning are explored. A variety of assessment tools for assessing development and functioning of individuals and families as well as strategies for intervening with individuals and family are examined. The role of the APN in assessment, implementing intervention, and evaluating outcomes aimed at promoting optimal human development and family functioning are critically examined and discussed.

*110.549, 110.551, 110.552, 110.553, 110.554, 110.569, 110.583, and 110.560 have a clinical component. 

Joint Requirements

NR.500.601 Theory and Practice of Public Health Nursing - Didactic
Analysis of theories relevant to nursing and public health will assist the student in the identification of the unique role of public health nursing across settings. Students will explore the role and function of public health nursing in primary and secondary prevention in the community, state and nation. Special emphasis will be placed on assessing the community as client and developing models of community-based health promotion and prevention.
NR.500.602 Public Health Nursing Theory & Practice - Practicum
Students enrolled in this course conduct a community assessment and write a proposal to address or prevent a risk factor or health problem in that population/community. The practicum is conducted in a community agency or established program. (Total of 168 hours) Prerequisites: NR.500.601, 500.604, 500.605, PH.340.601, PH.140.611 & 612 OR PH.140.621, 622 & 623
NR.500.605 Public Health Nursing Leadership & Management
This didactic course is focused on the analysis, integration and application of principles of leadership and management to health care organizations and to population-based efforts across the health care delivery system. Special emphasis is placed on the practical skills needed for nurses to succeed as leaders and managers in today's local, state, national and international health care environment. Prerequisite: NR 500.601
NR.500.607 Public Health Nursing/NP Capstone Practicum
This course will provide MSN-NP/MPH students with the opportunity to integrate their knowledge of public health problems and population-based assessment, prevention and intervention, with direct care and evaluation of clinical outcomes. Applying this knowledge to the evaluation of public health policy will be an integrating theme of the course. This course will fulfill the SPH Capstone and Integrating Experience requirement. Pre/corequisites: NR.110.560, 500.602, and all NP courses

*Credit for joint courses are applied to both the MSN and the MPH requirements.
**500.602 and 500.606 have a clinical component.

Quantitative Sciences

PH.140.611-612 Statistical Reasoning in Public Health
-or-
PH.140.621-623 Statistical Methods in Public Health
-or-
PH.140.651-654 Methods in Biostatistics I-IV

Public Health Requirements

PH.306.841.01 - Introduction to Bioethics in Public Health Practice and Research
PH.550.860.82 - Academic and Research Ethics at Johns Hopkins
PH.300.603 - Tools for Public Health Practice and Decision Making
PH.180.601 - Environmental Health
PH.340.601 - Principle of Epidemiology
PH.550.867 - Introduction to MPH Studies-MPH Individualized Goals and Analysis
PH.380.755 - Population Dynamics and Public Health
                   Quantitative Sciences Requirement - 3 options 
                   Biological Sciences Requirements - 15 options
                   Management Sciences Requirement - 6 options

Sample Courses
of Study

Sample Courses of Study

The curriculum includes core courses from each master’s program, 500 clinical hours, and begins each July. Credit for joint courses is applied to both the MSN (credits) and MPH (units) requirements.

Full-time

Summer I (15 units)

  • PH.340.601 - Principles of Epidemiology (5 units)
  • PH.180.601 - Environmental Health (5 units)
  • PH.550.867 - Introduction to MPH Studies (1 unit)
  • PH.380.753 - Population Dynamics and Public Health (2 units)
  • PH.300.603 - Tools of Public Health Practice and Decision Making (1 unit)
  • PH.306.841.01 - Introductions to Bioethics in Public Health Practice and Research (1 unit)
  • PH.550.860.82 - Academic and Research Ethics at Johns Hopkins (0 units)

                              MPH Individual Goals Analysis (P/F)

Fall I (14 credits)

NR.110.508 Clinical Pharmacology
This course focuses on the clinical uses and mechanisms of action of drug groups used in altered states of physiological function. Pharmacological mechanisms, drug interactions, side effects and contraindications will be presented as bases for clinical judgment and management of patients.
NR.110.502 Physiological/Pathophysiological Basis for Advanced Nursing Practice I
This course focuses on the interrelationship between normal physiology and pathophysiology across the lifespan. It is designed to expand the student's understanding of the pathophysiology underlying dysfunction in selected diseases that advanced practice nurses may commonly encounter in their patient populations. Using an integrative approach, representative alternations in physiologic function common throughout the lifespan are addressed. Completion of this course will enable the student to analyze and address physiologic challenges of practice. In addition, it will provide foundational knowledge for use in research involving issues that impact clinical practice. Weekly lecture/discussions are organized based on systems and cover topics from the cellular level up to major organ systems. Prerequisites: Undergraduate anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology.
NR.110.549 Advanced Health Assessment and Measurement
This course provides an introduction to the skills of advanced history taking and physical assessment. Lectures are designed to help the students apply their knowledge of health assessment to both primary and acute care settings. Emphasis is placed on differentiation between normal and abnormal findings, recognition of common health problems, and clinical reasoning. Core content will be taught simultaneously to adult, pediatric, family, and acute care nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist students. Course content will provide learning opportunities in the following conceptual areas: communication, history taking, problem oriented medical records, physical assessment, age and gender health screening and diagnostic testing. A clinical practicum provides opportunities to apply physical assessment skills in settings including emergency departments and schools. Pre/corequisites: NR 110.502, 110.508, 110.536 and/or 110.537
NR.110.536 Health Assessment and Measurement: Adult/Geriatric Variations
This course provides an intensive and comprehensive introduction to the skills of history taking and advanced physical assessment for the adult/geriatric patient. The online modules are designed to help students apply their knowledge of physical assessment of adult/geriatric clients to the primary care or acute care setting. Emphasis is placed on the differentiation between normal and abnormal findings, recognition of common health problems, beginning development of a differential diagnosis and the process of critically thinking through problems related to adult/geriatric health. Corequisite: NR.110.549
NR.110.537 Health Assessment and Measurement: Pediatric Variations
This course provides an intensive and comprehensive introduction to the skills of history taking and advanced physical assessment for the pediatric patient. Lecture and clinical experiences are designed to help the student apply their knowledge of physical assessment of pediatric clients to the primary care setting. Emphasis is placed on the differentiation between normal and abnormal findings, recognition of common health problems, development of a differential diagnosis and the process of critically thinking through problems related to child health. Pre/corequisites: NR 100.502, 100.508, 110.549, and 100.589 or 100.555
NR.110.547 Diagnosis, Symptom and Illness Management I - Adult
This course provides didactic content to prepare the Advanced Practice Nurse to provide primary and/or acute care to adults, including older persons, experiencing health problems in one or more body systems. Nurse practitioner students focus on health care for all populations, with particular emphasis on underserved and those from other cultures. Students also emphasize health promotion and disease prevention, screening of adult and older populations, and providing culturally competent care. Didactic content addresses comprehensive diagnosis and management of common health problems, including appropriate diagnostic procedures, laboratory tests, and follow-up care for patients with both acute and chronic conditions. Professional, ethical, and legal issues are also addressed. Pre/corequisites: NR.110.502, 110.508 (Primary Care NPs), 110.549, 110.536/537, 110.572 (ACNP only)
NR.110.548 Diagnosis, Symptom and Illness Management I - Pediatrics
This course provides didactic information to prepare the pediatric or family nurse practitioner student to provide primary care for the pediatric population, from birth through adolescence. Emphasis is placed on integration of nursing process and theory with techniques of clinical health assessment and management of infants, children and adolescents. Didactic content addresses comprehensive diagnosis and management of common health problems, including appropriate diagnostic procedures, laboratory tests, and follow-up care for patients with both acute and chronic conditions. The course has a strong focus on health promotion, disease prevention, the care of underserved populations, and culturally competent care. Pre/corequisites: NR.110.502, 110.508, 110.537, and 110.549

 Spring I (9 credits/5 units)

NR.110.551 Advanced Practice in Primary Care I: Adult/Gero
This course provides clinical experience in adult health care settings (adolescent ages 16 to geriatric). It emphasizes the integration of theory, anticipatory guidance, health promotion and disease prevention, and clinical decision making throughout the entire spectrum of the adult lifespan. Students will perform comprehensive and episodic clinical assessments, including appropriate diagnostic testing and therapeutic interventions. Management of both stable, chronic illness and treatment of acute, episodic health problems will be accomplished with the direction of clinical preceptors. Students will work with faculty, nurse practitioner, physician assistant, and physician preceptors in a variety of primary care clinical practicum sites including college health services, health maintenance organizations, community based clinics, long-term care, assisted living, continuing care, retirement communities, occupational health settings, urgent care/fast track, and private practice. Clinical placements are arranged by faculty with individual preceptors. Preceptors and students arrange mutually convenient clinical hours. A minimum of 196 clinical hours are required this semester; this works out to about 14 hours per week. A two hour weekly clinical seminar will review diagnostic and treatment regimens in a case study format. Information presented will focus on the collection of subjective and objective data, pertinent laboratory findings, diagnostic tests, differential diagnoses and a plan for therapeutic intervention. Cases will focus on underserved, vulnerable and elder patient populations. Prerequisites: NR.110.502, 110.508, 110.549, 110.536, 110.547 Corequisites: 110.557, 110.589
NR.110.557 Diagnosis, Symptom and Illness Management II - Adults
This course expands on knowledge obtained in Diagnosis, Symptom, Illness I and continues to provide a foundation for the student to think critically about symptoms, differential diagnoses, diagnostic evaluation, and the management of common episodic and chronic health conditions throughout the adult lifespan including young adults, adults and older adults. The course emphasizes evidence based practice, health promotion and disease prevention as well as illness care that is based on age, gender, culture, ethnicity, and psycho-social issues. The unique perspective the nurse practitioner brings to the patient encounter, as well as interprofessional collaboration with colleagues, and knowledge of specialty referral are important elements of the course. Prerequisites: NR.110.502, 110.508, 110.536, 110.547, and 110.549 Corequisites: NR.110.551 and 110.589
NR.110.589 Human and Family Development through the Lifespan
This course provides an overview of major concepts, theories, and research related to human development across the lifespan from the prenatal period to death. Simultaneously, major theories and research related to family development across the lifespan are examined. Significant factors that influence individual and family development functioning are explored. A variety of assessment tools for assessing development and functioning of individuals and families as well as strategies for intervening with individuals and family are examined. The role of the APN in assessment, implementing intervention, and evaluating outcomes aimed at promoting optimal human development and family functioning are critically examined and discussed.
  •  Public Health Electives (5 units)

*Either NR.110.551 (Adult) and NR.110.557 (Adult) OR NR.110.552 (Ped.) and NR.110.558 (Ped.) can be taken.

Summer II (7 credits/8 units)

NR.110.569 Advanced Practice in Women's Health
This course provides clinical experience in ambulatory obstetric and gynecologic health care settings. (Note: Students in this course may only see females ages 12 and older for OB/GYN issues, and males ages 12 and older for STD diagnosis and treatment). It emphasizes the integration and application of theory, health promotion, disease prevention, the diagnostic process, and clinical decision making to women's health issues. Students will perform comprehensive clinical assessments, including appropriate diagnostic testing and therapeutic interventions. Management of routine prenatal, postnatal, and gynecologic care and health problems will be accomplished under the direction of clinical preceptors. Seminar classes utilize both an interactive lecture and/or a case study format to review and analyze the diagnostic (process) and treatment regimens. While cases will focus on diverse populations of women, there will be an emphasis on women from underserved populations. Prerequisite: NR.110.551
NR.110.504 Context of Healthcare for Advanced Practice Nursing
This three credit course examines the scope and status of professional roles and responsibilities of nurses prepared for advanced clinical and managerial placements in diverse health care settings. Course content and activities will focus on understanding forces driving contemporary health care and enhancing skills in outcomes evaluation, as well as efficient and effective function in a continuous change health care environment.
  •  Public Health Electives (8 units)

*Either NR.110.551 (Adult) and NR.110.557 (Adult) OR NR.110.569 (Women's) can be taken.

Fall II (20 credits/11 units)

NR.110.552 Advanced Practice in Primary Care I: Pediatrics
This course provides clinical experience in pediatric health care settings (infant through adolescent). It emphasizes the integration of theory, development, health promotion and disease prevention, and clinical decision making. Students will perform comprehensive and episodic clinical assessments, including appropriate diagnostic testing and therapeutic interventions. Management of both stable, chronic illness and treatment of acute, episodic health problems will be accomplished with the direction of clinical preceptors. Clinical placements are arranged by faculty with individual preceptors. A minimum of 14 clinical hours per week are required. A two hour weekly clinical seminar will review diagnostic and treatment regimens in a case study format. Information presented will focus on the collection of subjective and objective data, pertinent laboratory findings, diagnostic tests, differential diagnoses and a plan for therapeutic intervention. Prerequisites: NR.110.502, 110.508, 110.549, 110.537, 110.548 Corequisites: NR.110.558, 110.589
NR.110.558 Diagnosis, Symptom and Illness Management II: Pediatrics
This course provides didactic information to prepare the pediatric or family nurse practitioner student to provide primary care for the pediatric population, from birth through adolescence. Emphasis is placed on integration of nursing process and theory with the incorporation of techniques and critical thinking skills for the clinical health assessment and management of infants, children and adolescents. Didactic content addresses comprehensive diagnosis and management of common health problems, including appropriate diagnostic procedures, laboratory tests, follow-up care, and referral/collaboration with specialty professionals for patients with both acute and chronic conditions. The course has a strong focus on health promotion, appropriate screening, and disease prevention, the care of underserved populations, and culturally competent care. Prerequisites: NR.110.502, 110.508, 110.537, 110.548, 110.549 Corequisites: NR.110.552, 110.589
NR.110.569 Advanced Practice in Women's Health
This course provides clinical experience in ambulatory obstetric and gynecologic health care settings. (Note: Students in this course may only see females ages 12 and older for OB/GYN issues, and males ages 12 and older for STD diagnosis and treatment). It emphasizes the integration and application of theory, health promotion, disease prevention, the diagnostic process, and clinical decision making to women's health issues. Students will perform comprehensive clinical assessments, including appropriate diagnostic testing and therapeutic interventions. Management of routine prenatal, postnatal, and gynecologic care and health problems will be accomplished under the direction of clinical preceptors. Seminar classes utilize both an interactive lecture and/or a case study format to review and analyze the diagnostic (process) and treatment regimens. While cases will focus on diverse populations of women, there will be an emphasis on women from underserved populations. Prerequisite: NR.110.551
NR.110.500 Philosophical, Theoretical, and Ethical Basis for Nursing
This course will explore the conceptual, theoretical, and ethical bases of nursing. Selected conceptual models and frameworks of nursing and ethics will be analyzed with emphasis on implications for nursing practice. This course is designed to provide students with frameworks, concepts, and personal and professional exercises for approaching nursing practice issues and to enhance the student's understanding of theoretical, conceptual and ethical issues in nursing and in health care and to respond to them specifically.
NR.500.601 Theory and Practice of Public Health Nursing - Didactic
Analysis of theories relevant to nursing and public health will assist the student in the identification of the unique role of public health nursing across settings. Students will explore the role and function of public health nursing in primary and secondary prevention in the community, state and nation. Special emphasis will be placed on assessing the community as client and developing models of community-based health promotion and prevention.
  •  PH.140.611-612 - Statistical Reasoning in Public Health I-II (Biostatistics) [6 units]

*Either NR.110.569 (Women's) OR NR.110.552 (Ped.) and NR.110.558 (Ped.) can be taken.

Spring II (4 credits/16 units)

NR.110.501 Intermediate Biostatistics
This course provides students with a conceptual and practical approach to statistical methods in health care research. It focuses on statistical thinking and the appropriate use of statistical methods,including descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, correlation, simple linear and multiple regressions, logistic regression, odds-ratios, t-tests, ANOVA, ANCOVA, sampling methods, research design, and nonparametric tests. Understanding will be emphasized with computer applications and examples drawn from the nursing research literature and clinical and administrative databases. Prerequisite: Undergraduate statistics
NR.110.583 Family as a Unit: Clinical Integration
This course integrates theory and research in clinical applications of the care of families by nurse practitioners. Students will provide care to adults and children within their family context in one clinical setting under the guidance of a clinical preceptor. Emphasis is on applying theory and research to families with members experiencing complex health problems. Related professional issues will be explored in the clinical seminar. Prerequisites: NR 110.553 or 554 AND 110.569
NR.500.605 Public Health Nursing Leadership & Management
This didactic course is focused on the analysis, integration and application of principles of leadership and management to health care organizations and to population-based efforts across the health care delivery system. Special emphasis is placed on the practical skills needed for nurses to succeed as leaders and managers in today's local, state, national and international health care environment. Prerequisite: NR 500.601
  •  Public Health Electives (8 units)

Summer III (3 credits/2 units)

NR.500.602 Public Health Nursing Theory & Practice - Practicum
Students enrolled in this course conduct a community assessment and write a proposal to address or prevent a risk factor or health problem in that population/community. The practicum is conducted in a community agency or established program. (Total of 168 hours) Prerequisites: NR.500.601, 500.604, 500.605, PH.340.601, PH.140.611 & 612 OR PH.140.621, 622 & 623
NR.500.607 Public Health Nursing/NP Capstone Practicum
This course will provide MSN-NP/MPH students with the opportunity to integrate their knowledge of public health problems and population-based assessment, prevention and intervention, with direct care and evaluation of clinical outcomes. Applying this knowledge to the evaluation of public health policy will be an integrating theme of the course. This course will fulfill the SPH Capstone and Integrating Experience requirement. Pre/corequisites: NR.110.560, 500.602, and all NP courses
NR.110.560 Program Development and Evaluation in Health Care
This course is an introduction to the basic methods of program evaluation. Emphasis is given to designs that are popular and feasible in health care settings, and to programs for vulnerable populations. Consultant and group facilitation skills are described and assessed. Prerequisites: There are no pre- or corequisites but recommended prior or concurrent courses include introductory graduate-level courses in descriptive and inferential statistics and research design.

*NP Clinical course = 828 NP clinical hours
**Both SON credits and SPH units awarded for NR.500.601, NR.500.605, NR.500.602 & NR.500.607.

Part-time

Summer I (11 units)

  • PH.180.601 - Environmental Health (5 units)
  • PH.340.601 - Principals of Epidemiology (5 units)
  • PH.550.867 - Introduction to MPH Studies (1 unit)
  • PH.550.860.82 - Academic and Research Ethics at Johns Hopkins (0 units)

                             MPH Individual Goals Analysis

Fall I (7 credits/6 units)

NR.110.502 Physiological/Pathophysiological Basis for Advanced Nursing Practice I
This course focuses on the interrelationship between normal physiology and pathophysiology across the lifespan. It is designed to expand the student's understanding of the pathophysiology underlying dysfunction in selected diseases that advanced practice nurses may commonly encounter in their patient populations. Using an integrative approach, representative alternations in physiologic function common throughout the lifespan are addressed. Completion of this course will enable the student to analyze and address physiologic challenges of practice. In addition, it will provide foundational knowledge for use in research involving issues that impact clinical practice. Weekly lecture/discussions are organized based on systems and cover topics from the cellular level up to major organ systems. Prerequisites: Undergraduate anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology.
  •  PH.140.611-612 - Statistical Reasoning in Public Health I-II (Online) [4 credits/6 units]

Spring I (3 credits/7 units)

NR.110.508 Clinical Pharmacology
This course focuses on the clinical uses and mechanisms of action of drug groups used in altered states of physiological function. Pharmacological mechanisms, drug interactions, side effects and contraindications will be presented as bases for clinical judgment and management of patients.
NR.110.589 Human and Family Development through the Lifespan
This course provides an overview of major concepts, theories, and research related to human development across the lifespan from the prenatal period to death. Simultaneously, major theories and research related to family development across the lifespan are examined. Significant factors that influence individual and family development functioning are explored. A variety of assessment tools for assessing development and functioning of individuals and families as well as strategies for intervening with individuals and family are examined. The role of the APN in assessment, implementing intervention, and evaluating outcomes aimed at promoting optimal human development and family functioning are critically examined and discussed.
  • Public Health Electives

Summer II (6 units)

  • PH.300.603 - Tools of Public Health Practice and Decision Making (3 units)
  • PH.380.753 - Population Dynamics and Public Health (2 units)
  • Ph.306.841.01 - Introduction to Bioethics in Public Health Practice and Research (1 unit)

Fall II (8 credits)

NR.110.549 Advanced Health Assessment and Measurement
This course provides an introduction to the skills of advanced history taking and physical assessment. Lectures are designed to help the students apply their knowledge of health assessment to both primary and acute care settings. Emphasis is placed on differentiation between normal and abnormal findings, recognition of common health problems, and clinical reasoning. Core content will be taught simultaneously to adult, pediatric, family, and acute care nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist students. Course content will provide learning opportunities in the following conceptual areas: communication, history taking, problem oriented medical records, physical assessment, age and gender health screening and diagnostic testing. A clinical practicum provides opportunities to apply physical assessment skills in settings including emergency departments and schools. Pre/corequisites: NR 110.502, 110.508, 110.536 and/or 110.537
NR.110.536 Health Assessment and Measurement: Adult/Geriatric Variations
This course provides an intensive and comprehensive introduction to the skills of history taking and advanced physical assessment for the adult/geriatric patient. The online modules are designed to help students apply their knowledge of physical assessment of adult/geriatric clients to the primary care or acute care setting. Emphasis is placed on the differentiation between normal and abnormal findings, recognition of common health problems, beginning development of a differential diagnosis and the process of critically thinking through problems related to adult/geriatric health. Corequisite: NR.110.549
NR.110.537 Health Assessment and Measurement: Pediatric Variations
This course provides an intensive and comprehensive introduction to the skills of history taking and advanced physical assessment for the pediatric patient. Lecture and clinical experiences are designed to help the student apply their knowledge of physical assessment of pediatric clients to the primary care setting. Emphasis is placed on the differentiation between normal and abnormal findings, recognition of common health problems, development of a differential diagnosis and the process of critically thinking through problems related to child health. Pre/corequisites: NR 100.502, 100.508, 110.549, and 100.589 or 100.555
NR.110.547 Diagnosis, Symptom and Illness Management I - Adult
This course provides didactic content to prepare the Advanced Practice Nurse to provide primary and/or acute care to adults, including older persons, experiencing health problems in one or more body systems. Nurse practitioner students focus on health care for all populations, with particular emphasis on underserved and those from other cultures. Students also emphasize health promotion and disease prevention, screening of adult and older populations, and providing culturally competent care. Didactic content addresses comprehensive diagnosis and management of common health problems, including appropriate diagnostic procedures, laboratory tests, and follow-up care for patients with both acute and chronic conditions. Professional, ethical, and legal issues are also addressed. Pre/corequisites: NR.110.502, 110.508 (Primary Care NPs), 110.549, 110.536/537, 110.572 (ACNP only)
NR.110.548 Diagnosis, Symptom and Illness Management I - Pediatrics
This course provides didactic information to prepare the pediatric or family nurse practitioner student to provide primary care for the pediatric population, from birth through adolescence. Emphasis is placed on integration of nursing process and theory with techniques of clinical health assessment and management of infants, children and adolescents. Didactic content addresses comprehensive diagnosis and management of common health problems, including appropriate diagnostic procedures, laboratory tests, and follow-up care for patients with both acute and chronic conditions. The course has a strong focus on health promotion, disease prevention, the care of underserved populations, and culturally competent care. Pre/corequisites: NR.110.502, 110.508, 110.537, and 110.549

 Spring II (6 credits/5 units)

NR.110.551 Advanced Practice in Primary Care I: Adult/Gero
This course provides clinical experience in adult health care settings (adolescent ages 16 to geriatric). It emphasizes the integration of theory, anticipatory guidance, health promotion and disease prevention, and clinical decision making throughout the entire spectrum of the adult lifespan. Students will perform comprehensive and episodic clinical assessments, including appropriate diagnostic testing and therapeutic interventions. Management of both stable, chronic illness and treatment of acute, episodic health problems will be accomplished with the direction of clinical preceptors. Students will work with faculty, nurse practitioner, physician assistant, and physician preceptors in a variety of primary care clinical practicum sites including college health services, health maintenance organizations, community based clinics, long-term care, assisted living, continuing care, retirement communities, occupational health settings, urgent care/fast track, and private practice. Clinical placements are arranged by faculty with individual preceptors. Preceptors and students arrange mutually convenient clinical hours. A minimum of 196 clinical hours are required this semester; this works out to about 14 hours per week. A two hour weekly clinical seminar will review diagnostic and treatment regimens in a case study format. Information presented will focus on the collection of subjective and objective data, pertinent laboratory findings, diagnostic tests, differential diagnoses and a plan for therapeutic intervention. Cases will focus on underserved, vulnerable and elder patient populations. Prerequisites: NR.110.502, 110.508, 110.549, 110.536, 110.547 Corequisites: 110.557, 110.589
NR.110.557 Diagnosis, Symptom and Illness Management II - Adults
This course expands on knowledge obtained in Diagnosis, Symptom, Illness I and continues to provide a foundation for the student to think critically about symptoms, differential diagnoses, diagnostic evaluation, and the management of common episodic and chronic health conditions throughout the adult lifespan including young adults, adults and older adults. The course emphasizes evidence based practice, health promotion and disease prevention as well as illness care that is based on age, gender, culture, ethnicity, and psycho-social issues. The unique perspective the nurse practitioner brings to the patient encounter, as well as interprofessional collaboration with colleagues, and knowledge of specialty referral are important elements of the course. Prerequisites: NR.110.502, 110.508, 110.536, 110.547, and 110.549 Corequisites: NR.110.551 and 110.589
NR.110.558 Diagnosis, Symptom and Illness Management II: Pediatrics
This course provides didactic information to prepare the pediatric or family nurse practitioner student to provide primary care for the pediatric population, from birth through adolescence. Emphasis is placed on integration of nursing process and theory with the incorporation of techniques and critical thinking skills for the clinical health assessment and management of infants, children and adolescents. Didactic content addresses comprehensive diagnosis and management of common health problems, including appropriate diagnostic procedures, laboratory tests, follow-up care, and referral/collaboration with specialty professionals for patients with both acute and chronic conditions. The course has a strong focus on health promotion, appropriate screening, and disease prevention, the care of underserved populations, and culturally competent care. Prerequisites: NR.110.502, 110.508, 110.537, 110.548, 110.549 Corequisites: NR.110.552, 110.589
  •  Public Health Electives

*Either NR.110.551 (Adult) and NR.110.557 (Adult) OR NR.110.552 (Ped.) and NR.110.558 (Ped.) can be taken.

Summer III (7-9 credits)

NR.110.569 Advanced Practice in Women's Health
This course provides clinical experience in ambulatory obstetric and gynecologic health care settings. (Note: Students in this course may only see females ages 12 and older for OB/GYN issues, and males ages 12 and older for STD diagnosis and treatment). It emphasizes the integration and application of theory, health promotion, disease prevention, the diagnostic process, and clinical decision making to women's health issues. Students will perform comprehensive clinical assessments, including appropriate diagnostic testing and therapeutic interventions. Management of routine prenatal, postnatal, and gynecologic care and health problems will be accomplished under the direction of clinical preceptors. Seminar classes utilize both an interactive lecture and/or a case study format to review and analyze the diagnostic (process) and treatment regimens. While cases will focus on diverse populations of women, there will be an emphasis on women from underserved populations. Prerequisite: NR.110.551
NR.110.504 Context of Healthcare for Advanced Practice Nursing
This three credit course examines the scope and status of professional roles and responsibilities of nurses prepared for advanced clinical and managerial placements in diverse health care settings. Course content and activities will focus on understanding forces driving contemporary health care and enhancing skills in outcomes evaluation, as well as efficient and effective function in a continuous change health care environment.

 *Either NR.110.551 (Adult) and NR.110.557 (Adult) OR NR.110.569 (Women's) can be taken.

Fall  III (11-13 credits/11 units)

NR.110.552 Advanced Practice in Primary Care I: Pediatrics
This course provides clinical experience in pediatric health care settings (infant through adolescent). It emphasizes the integration of theory, development, health promotion and disease prevention, and clinical decision making. Students will perform comprehensive and episodic clinical assessments, including appropriate diagnostic testing and therapeutic interventions. Management of both stable, chronic illness and treatment of acute, episodic health problems will be accomplished with the direction of clinical preceptors. Clinical placements are arranged by faculty with individual preceptors. A minimum of 14 clinical hours per week are required. A two hour weekly clinical seminar will review diagnostic and treatment regimens in a case study format. Information presented will focus on the collection of subjective and objective data, pertinent laboratory findings, diagnostic tests, differential diagnoses and a plan for therapeutic intervention. Prerequisites: NR.110.502, 110.508, 110.549, 110.537, 110.548 Corequisites: NR.110.558, 110.589
NR.110.558 Diagnosis, Symptom and Illness Management II: Pediatrics
This course provides didactic information to prepare the pediatric or family nurse practitioner student to provide primary care for the pediatric population, from birth through adolescence. Emphasis is placed on integration of nursing process and theory with the incorporation of techniques and critical thinking skills for the clinical health assessment and management of infants, children and adolescents. Didactic content addresses comprehensive diagnosis and management of common health problems, including appropriate diagnostic procedures, laboratory tests, follow-up care, and referral/collaboration with specialty professionals for patients with both acute and chronic conditions. The course has a strong focus on health promotion, appropriate screening, and disease prevention, the care of underserved populations, and culturally competent care. Prerequisites: NR.110.502, 110.508, 110.537, 110.548, 110.549 Corequisites: NR.110.552, 110.589
NR.110.569 Advanced Practice in Women's Health
This course provides clinical experience in ambulatory obstetric and gynecologic health care settings. (Note: Students in this course may only see females ages 12 and older for OB/GYN issues, and males ages 12 and older for STD diagnosis and treatment). It emphasizes the integration and application of theory, health promotion, disease prevention, the diagnostic process, and clinical decision making to women's health issues. Students will perform comprehensive clinical assessments, including appropriate diagnostic testing and therapeutic interventions. Management of routine prenatal, postnatal, and gynecologic care and health problems will be accomplished under the direction of clinical preceptors. Seminar classes utilize both an interactive lecture and/or a case study format to review and analyze the diagnostic (process) and treatment regimens. While cases will focus on diverse populations of women, there will be an emphasis on women from underserved populations. Prerequisite: NR.110.551
NR.500.601 Theory and Practice of Public Health Nursing - Didactic
Analysis of theories relevant to nursing and public health will assist the student in the identification of the unique role of public health nursing across settings. Students will explore the role and function of public health nursing in primary and secondary prevention in the community, state and nation. Special emphasis will be placed on assessing the community as client and developing models of community-based health promotion and prevention.
NR.110.503 Applications of Research to Practice
This course prepares students for clinical, management, or education leadership roles in health care through translation of the best available evidence into practice within organizations and application of research for nursing practice. Students will develop skills and knowledge needed to review and synthesize the strength of evidence available, and recommend practice changes if indicated. Topics covered include: a review of the research process (including theoretical framework, design, and analysis, research design hierarchy), research critique, rating and synthesizing the strength of evidence, decision making for practice, research and research translation opportunities (outcomes, evaluation research, quality improvement, cost-effectiveness analysis), risk adjustment, measurement, research ethics and organizational change. Prerequisite: NR 110.501
  •  PH.140.611-612 - Statistical Reasoning in Public Health I-II (Biostatistics) [6 units]

*Either NR.110.569 (Women's) OR NR.110.552 (Ped.) and NR.110.558 (Ped.) can be taken.

Spring III (4 credits/16 units)

NR.500.602 Public Health Nursing Theory & Practice - Practicum
Students enrolled in this course conduct a community assessment and write a proposal to address or prevent a risk factor or health problem in that population/community. The practicum is conducted in a community agency or established program. (Total of 168 hours) Prerequisites: NR.500.601, 500.604, 500.605, PH.340.601, PH.140.611 & 612 OR PH.140.621, 622 & 623
NR.500.607 Public Health Nursing/NP Capstone Practicum
This course will provide MSN-NP/MPH students with the opportunity to integrate their knowledge of public health problems and population-based assessment, prevention and intervention, with direct care and evaluation of clinical outcomes. Applying this knowledge to the evaluation of public health policy will be an integrating theme of the course. This course will fulfill the SPH Capstone and Integrating Experience requirement. Pre/corequisites: NR.110.560, 500.602, and all NP courses
  •  Public Health Electives (8 units)

Summer IV (3 credits/2 units)

NR.500.602 Public Health Nursing Theory & Practice - Practicum
Students enrolled in this course conduct a community assessment and write a proposal to address or prevent a risk factor or health problem in that population/community. The practicum is conducted in a community agency or established program. (Total of 168 hours) Prerequisites: NR.500.601, 500.604, 500.605, PH.340.601, PH.140.611 & 612 OR PH.140.621, 622 & 623
NR.500.607 Public Health Nursing/NP Capstone Practicum
This course will provide MSN-NP/MPH students with the opportunity to integrate their knowledge of public health problems and population-based assessment, prevention and intervention, with direct care and evaluation of clinical outcomes. Applying this knowledge to the evaluation of public health policy will be an integrating theme of the course. This course will fulfill the SPH Capstone and Integrating Experience requirement. Pre/corequisites: NR.110.560, 500.602, and all NP courses
NR.110.560 Program Development and Evaluation in Health Care
This course is an introduction to the basic methods of program evaluation. Emphasis is given to designs that are popular and feasible in health care settings, and to programs for vulnerable populations. Consultant and group facilitation skills are described and assessed. Prerequisites: There are no pre- or corequisites but recommended prior or concurrent courses include introductory graduate-level courses in descriptive and inferential statistics and research design.

*NP Clinical course = 828 NP clinical hours
**Both SON credits and SPH units awarded for NR.500.601, NR.500.605, NR.500.602 & NR.500.607.

Tuition
 

Tuition

Tuition and Other Costs

Billed Expenses (July 2014 - May 2015)
Tuition:$56,240* (full-time per year)
Per credit cost:$1,480
Matriculation fee:$500 (onetime only fee for first-time enrolled JHU students)
Health Insurance:$2,959**
Health Fee:$450
 

Estimated Other Expenses***

Room and Board:$15,026
Books/Supplies:$2,320
Personal Expenses:up to $1,650
Travel Expenses:up to $4,114


*Full-time: 16 credit hours per semester; 6 credits hours summer semester
**All students must have health coverage. Purchase of the School's plan is optional.
***Amounts for other expenses vary based upon student's selection of books, supplies, and living arrangements.

Billed expenses are subject to change without prior notice.

More
Info 

More Information

Program is designed for nurses seeking to integrate nurse practitioner clinical practice with a population-based public health perspective. The MSN-NP/MPH is designed specifically for nurses seeking to link their clinical interests with public health practice. This combined program prepares nurse practitioners with a focus in community health, and knowledge of population-based public health science and practice.

Nurses in advanced practice often return to school at a later time for a degree in public health to make their approach to individual health problems more comprehensive. Obtaining the joint degree at the outset, students acquire the complementary skills, knowledge and perspective of both disciplines. Graduate education in nursing equips students with advanced mastery of nursing theory and practice, while public health training provides a population-based, multi-disciplinary team approach.

The programs include core courses from each school's masters program. The remaining courses fulfill each program's requirements. Students choose a patient population (adult, pediatrics, or family) focus in the nurse practitioner program. Graduates are eligible to apply for American Nurses Credentialing Center, National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) or American Academy of Nurse Practitioners certification.

Students must complete a total of 41 credits for Adult NP and Pediatric NP, and 51 credits for Family NP at the School of Nursing as well as 60 didactic units at the School of Public Health. Students will work closely with faculty academic advisers in the School of Nursing and the School of Public Health to plan individual academic curriculum. The program consists of a total of 500 clinical hours. Students have five years to complete the program from the date of matriculation. The MSN/MPH begins in July of each year.

71%
2010 nursing grad survey respondents reported little difficulty in job search

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